Local exchange and early state development in southwestern Iran.
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Local exchange and early state development in southwestern Iran.

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Published by Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan in Ann Arbor .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Khūzistān (Iran),
  • Iran,
  • Khūzistān.

Subjects:

  • Excavations (Archaeology) -- Iran -- Khūzistān.,
  • Khūzistān (Iran) -- Antiquities.,
  • Khūzistān (Iran) -- Politics and government.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Bibliography: p. 199-205.

SeriesAnthropological papers, no. 51
Classifications
LC ClassificationsGN2 .M5 no. 51, DS324.K49 .M5 no. 51
The Physical Object
Paginationx, 205 p.
Number of Pages205
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL5028248M
LC Control Number73623150

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Population, Exchange, and Early State Formation in Southwestern Iran HENRY T. WRIGHT University of Michigan GREGORY A. JOHNSON Hunter College, CUNY Several widely discussed single-wrriable explanations of the origin of the state are tested using data from Southwestern Iran. These data demonstrate that increasingCited by: Several widely discussed single‐variable explanations of the origin of the state are tested using data from Southwestern Iran. These data demonstrate that increasing population or increasing inter‐regional trade alone cannot explain the appearance of specialized governments during the fourth millennium by: If trade is the factor, then they would find the expansion of trade before the state. Although there were increases in local production and intra-regional exchange, no major increase for inter-regional exchange before the Early Uruk period. The third hypothesis suggests that the development of local ceramic production is an important factor. Population, Exchange, and Early State Formation in Southwestern Iran.

Early Fourth Millennium Developments in Southwestern Iran. " Local Exchange and Early State. Period VI at Godin Tepe provides some evidence of the development of this ceramic complex. PALÉORIENT, vol. 11/2 - REGIONAL PERSPECTIVES. ON SOUTHWEST IRANIAN STATE DEVELOPMENT. H. T. WRIGHT and G. A. JOHNSON. The times between B.C. and B.C. are particularly important for the understanding of the development of the first states in southwest Asia. Iran - Iran - Settlement patterns: The topography and the water supply determine the regions fit for human habitation, the lifestyles of the people, and the types of dwellings. The deep gorges and defiles, unnavigable rivers, empty deserts, and impenetrable kavīrs have all contributed to insularity and tribalism among the Iranian peoples, and the population has become concentrated around the. Early Human Life on the Iranian Plateau. Although geologically new, the area of Iran has been inhabited from the very early times. Archaeological excavations have uncovered skeletons of early homo erectus man in Iran and it seems that from the earliest stages of human development, Iran, as a land bridge, has been constantly inhabited.

  In southwestern Iran, roughly km ( mi) south of the capital city of Tehran, and some 70 km (40 mi) northeast of Shiraz, a cultivated plain gives way to the Zagros Mountains. At the transition between flat land and rugged mountain, at the base of . Seven years later, the firm discovered a huge pool of petroleum at Masjid al-Suleiman in southwestern Iran, and the future of that country was transformed. After World War I erupted in , Anglo-Persian would satisfy the Royal Navy's rapidly expanding appetite for diesel fuel by pumping oil from the world's largest refinery at Abadan, near. Tehran (/ t ɛəˈr æ n,-ˈ r ɑː n, ˌ t eɪ ə-/; Persian: تهران ‎ Ťehrân [tehˈɾɒːn] ()) is the capital of Iran and Tehran a population of around million in the city and 15 million in the larger metropolitan area of Greater Tehran, Tehran is the most populous city in Iran and Western Asia, and has the second-largest metropolitan area in the Middle East (after. However, their cultural and religious traditions long remained similar. In Iran a priest named Zoroaster reformed the Indo-Iranian polytheistic faith along ethical lines and preached a religion with one god, Ahura Mazda, and an underlying dualistic theology pitting Good against Evil. The Avesta is the religious book of the Zoroastrian religion.